First, The Bad News (by Dave Huth)

I think this video from my friend Dave Huth speaks for itself. You can see more at Dave’s very cool Salamander Slam site. 

So, what are you trying today?
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That’s a good question…

Perhaps the most significant life lesson I’ve learned in my young adulthood is that knowing all the answers isn’t as important as asking good questions. So every now and then I like to use Fridays to 1) link to other bloggers and writers who have asked compelling questions during the week and 2) open the floor for you to share whatever questions you’ve been wrestling with lately.

In response to our recent conversations about the Gospel, Jen at Conversion Diary asks, Can you share the gospel in 140 characters or less?

RJS at Jesus Creed asks, Is free will a figment of our imagination?

Jason Boyett asks a bunch of good questions in his interview with Nick Fiedler: Part 1Part 2

Keith asks, What stage of Lost grief are you in?

Chris Brogan asks, Do women want to lead?

***

Matt Appling at The Church of No People asked me a bunch of good questions in an interview he posted today. My favorite question was, What does this generation of Christians have to offer the next generation?

You can read my response here.

In the meantime, I’d love to hear how you would respond to that question.  So, today I’m posing two questions…

1. What does this generation of Christians have to offer the next generation? 
2. What questions are you asking this week—on your blog, at your dinner table, in your head, in your heart? (Feel free to include links!)

You can answer just one or both...cause it's a free country and it's Friday.

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What are you waiting for?

Transient

It seems like every couple of years, we cycle into a summer season that is packed full of weddings and births. There are showers to attend, appropriate dresses to buy, and a bunch of late RSVP cards stuck to the refrigerator like expectant little butterflies.

Dan and I are approaching one of those hectic summers ourselves, and in addition to all the weddings and births, we’re gearing up for the culmination of three years of hard work and anticipation with the big book launch in July.

As I talk to expectant mothers and sexually frustrated couples, and as I wake up each morning worrying about book sales and reviews, one theme seems to be recurring: Waiting sucks. 

And when you’re waiting, it often seems like that’s all you’re really doing—day in and day out.

Waiting.

Waiting.

Waiting.

We’ve been waiting for the book release, waiting for Dan’s business to pick up, waiting to find the right meeting place for The Mission, waiting for publishers to respond to book #2, waiting for the reconciliation of strained relationships, waiting for money to come in, waiting for direction, waiting for word.

I wrote a blog post about waiting during the season of Advent, but had no idea that all of this waiting would continue through Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, and now Pentecost.

So I’ve finally resigned myself to the fact that God probably wants me to learn how to be patient, not just for a season, but for a lifetime. If I cannot learn to find peace in the midst of anticipation, I will never experience the joy of contentment, for “we know that the whole creation has been groaning as in the pains of childbirth right up to the present time. Not only so, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.” (Romans 8:22-23)

It seems that waiting is part of what it means to be human, part of what it means to be connected to God’s creation.

Great.

I’m still trying to figure out what it means to embrace waiting as a part of life, but so far the most interesting fringe benefit I’ve observed is a newfound capacity for absorbing the significance of the little things.

If I didn’t have to wait for the next book deal, I’d be less humbled by the first. If I didn’t have to wait for the next paycheck, I’d be less creative with how I spent the last. If I didn’t have to wait for “success”, I’d never know I didn’t really need it to begin with. If I didn’t have to wait for more, I’d never know I already had enough.

Maybe, in the long run, the waiting will be worth it.

So, what are you waiting for? And what have you learned in the process?

(Photo by teo_ladodicivideo)

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Comment Policy: Please stay positive with your comments. If your comment is rude, it gets deleted. If it is critical, please make it constructive. If you are constantly negative or a general ass, troll, or hater, you will get banned. The definition of terms is left solely up to us.